/tagged/Fuck+Yeah+Africa+Rocks/page/2
typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.
Recipe
Ingredients
One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.
The Process
Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.
(Via Daily Monitor)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.
This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
  • Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
  • A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
  • Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
  • For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
  • Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.

The Process

  • Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
  • After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
  • You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.

(Via Daily Monitor)

(via africaisdonesuffering)

SA helped land Curiosity Mars rover
A South African team helped Nasa to land the Curiosity rover on Mars, the SA National Space Agency (Sansa) says.

The agency was proud to be part of Monday’s historic touch-down on the red planet, international business manager Tiaan Strydom said.
"This is one of the most important explorations of space by one of the most advanced space-faring nations in the world; and as Sansa we celebrate this event with the rest of humanity."
Curiosity was a US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) rover equipped to look for and analyse soil and rock samples for signs of alien life.
Due to its plutonium battery, Curiosity was able to work around the clock, as opposed to its solar-powered predecessors, like Spirit and Opportunity.
Managing director of Sansa space operations Raoul Hodges said the satellite tracking, telemetry (remote measurement and collection of data), and command team had demonstrated its expertise and proved it was capable of supporting most large-scale space missions.
Curiosity’s mission is expected to last at least one Martian year, which equates to 686 earth days. During this time, it would assess whether Mars had ever supported microbial life.

SA helped land Curiosity Mars rover

A South African team helped Nasa to land the Curiosity rover on Mars, the SA National Space Agency (Sansa) says.

The agency was proud to be part of Monday’s historic touch-down on the red planet, international business manager Tiaan Strydom said.

"This is one of the most important explorations of space by one of the most advanced space-faring nations in the world; and as Sansa we celebrate this event with the rest of humanity."

Curiosity was a US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) rover equipped to look for and analyse soil and rock samples for signs of alien life.

Due to its plutonium battery, Curiosity was able to work around the clock, as opposed to its solar-powered predecessors, like Spirit and Opportunity.

Managing director of Sansa space operations Raoul Hodges said the satellite tracking, telemetry (remote measurement and collection of data), and command team had demonstrated its expertise and proved it was capable of supporting most large-scale space missions.

Curiosity’s mission is expected to last at least one Martian year, which equates to 686 earth days. During this time, it would assess whether Mars had ever supported microbial life.

I wanted to write an answer on the article but it was too long :p

So I think Peternell deserves to go to London since he’s the best (in the ranking) 
What the Chief says is stupid about a real countrymen
They should know that if you want to compete against the best riders in the world, you have to come to Europe (I live in Belgium, and we are let’s say the Mecca of showjumping, especially Brussels) Horses can’t stand such long trips up and down from SA to EU, they can but not 4 to 5 times a year.
I ride dressage and when I check the list of Interntional competitions, I never see one in SA nor for dressage nor showjumping nor eventing.

So yeah … :) 

**FYAfrica Rocks Note: This is a submission in response to an earlier question on whether the South African eventing rider Peternell should compete in the Olympics representing South Africa. Read the post here

africaisdonesuffering:

Flash Mob in the streets of Bujumbura, Burundi.

submitted by: ohmydou

Olympic flag bearers
Doreen Lawrence, mother of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in a racially motivated attack in South East London. She has since fought for justice for victims of racially motivated violence.
Muhammad Ali, champion boxer, human and civil rights activist.
Sally Becker, British volunteer and goodwill ambassador.
Shami Chakrabart, Academic, Director of Liberty, a council promoting civil liberties and Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University.
Haille Gebreselassie, Ethiopian long distance athlete, record breaker and goodwill ambassador.
Ban Ki-moon, current Secretary General of the United Nations. 
Marina Silver, Brazilian environmentalist and politician, who has openly said she aims to be "the first African-Brazilian woman of poor origin" to become president of Brazil.

Olympic flag bearers

Doreen Lawrence, mother of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in a racially motivated attack in South East London. She has since fought for justice for victims of racially motivated violence.

Muhammad Ali, champion boxer, human and civil rights activist.

Sally Becker, British volunteer and goodwill ambassador.

Shami Chakrabart, Academic, Director of Liberty, a council promoting civil liberties and Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University.

Haille Gebreselassie, Ethiopian long distance athlete, record breaker and goodwill ambassador.

Ban Ki-moon, current Secretary General of the United Nations. 

Marina Silver, Brazilian environmentalist and politician, who has openly said she aims to be "the first African-Brazilian woman of poor origin" to become president of Brazil.

A Cameroonian athlete proudly flying flags during the Olympic Athlete Parade.

A Cameroonian athlete proudly flying flags during the Olympic Athlete Parade.

366flags:

LIBERIAThe Republic of Liberia is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Sierra Leone on the west, Guinea on the north and Côte d’Ivoire on the east. It covers an area of 111,369 km2 and is home to about 3.7 million people. English is the official language, while over 30 indigenous languages are spoken within the country.
Along with Ethiopia, Liberia is one of two modern countries in Sub-Saharan Africa without roots in the European colonization of Africa. Beginning in 1820, the region was colonized by free blacks from the United States; most of them had been formerly enslaved. With the help of the American Colonization Society, a private organization that believed ex-slaves would have greater freedom and equality in Africa, these immigrants from the U.S. established a new country. African captives freed from slave ships were also sent there instead of being repatriated to their countries of origin. In 1847, these colonists founded the Republic of Liberia, establishing a government modeled on that of the United States and naming the capital city Monrovia after James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States and a prominent supporter of the colonization. The colonists, known as Americo-Liberians, led the political and economic sectors of the country.
A military coup overthrew the Americo-Liberian leadership in 1980, marking the beginning of political and economic instability and two successive civil wars that left approximately 250,000 people dead and devastated the country’s economy. A 2003 peace deal led to democratic elections in 2005. [Source: Wikipedia]
Further Information:
Country Info
Flag Info

366flags:

LIBERIA
The Republic of Liberia is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Sierra Leone on the west, Guinea on the north and Côte d’Ivoire on the east. It covers an area of 111,369 km2 and is home to about 3.7 million people. English is the official language, while over 30 indigenous languages are spoken within the country.

Along with Ethiopia, Liberia is one of two modern countries in Sub-Saharan Africa without roots in the European colonization of Africa. Beginning in 1820, the region was colonized by free blacks from the United States; most of them had been formerly enslaved. With the help of the American Colonization Society, a private organization that believed ex-slaves would have greater freedom and equality in Africa, these immigrants from the U.S. established a new country. African captives freed from slave ships were also sent there instead of being repatriated to their countries of origin. In 1847, these colonists founded the Republic of Liberia, establishing a government modeled on that of the United States and naming the capital city Monrovia after James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States and a prominent supporter of the colonization. The colonists, known as Americo-Liberians, led the political and economic sectors of the country.

A military coup overthrew the Americo-Liberian leadership in 1980, marking the beginning of political and economic instability and two successive civil wars that left approximately 250,000 people dead and devastated the country’s economy. A 2003 peace deal led to democratic elections in 2005. [Source: Wikipedia]

Further Information:

Wajdi Bouallègue was born 9 February 1982 in Tunis, Tunisia. His father Mohamed Habib Bouallègue is his coach, as well as a former gymnastics champion. He’s won 21 gold medals in Africa, a record unmatched by any gymnast on the African continent. He is the only gymnast that will be representing Tunisia at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

Aya Medany is surprisingly young to be preparing for her third Olympic Games - and considering retirement.

Medany, not yet 24, is a modern pentathlete who made her debut for Egypt at the Athens Olympics in 2004, aged just 15.

Her sport demands that she fence, swim, ride horses, run and shoot. Her beliefs demand that she do it wearing specific clothing.

Medany, the only elite pentathlete to compete wearing a hijab, now thinks she may have to quit because of the conflict between her religion and her sport.

"I might have to choose after London 2012. I might have to leave," she tells BBC Sport after this year’s World Championships in Rome, where she finished 12th.

The problem is not the hijab, even though Medany says it puts her at a disadvantage when running.

Swimming is the issue - Medany wants to swim in an outfit which fully covers her body in order to conform with her interpretation of her Muslim faith, which emphasises modesty in dress.

However, the UIPM - modern pentathlon’s world governing body - will not let that happen.

Pentathlon takes its cue from Fina, the organisation which runs world swimming. Fina’s rules, amended in 2009 after outcry over ‘super-fast’ full-body swimsuits, state that swimwear for female competitors “shall not cover the neck, extend past the shoulder, nor extend below the knee”. Hence, Medany has to obey those rules.

That puts her in an awkward position regarding the media back home in Egypt and her public portrayal. But the UIPM told BBC Sport it cannot make exceptions for one athlete, even a woman it acknowledges has single-handedly established pentathlon on the African continent.

Medany’s is a complex case. She only took up wearing a hijab following the 2008 Beijing Games, and her relationship with reporters in her home country has been uneasy.

Egypt is a country of few genuine Olympic contenders, but Medany went to Beijing with a real chance of a medal. Come the women’s pentathlon, on the last day of the Games, Egypt had just one other medal: a bronze won by Hesham Mesbah in men’s judo.

"By the time of Beijing, I had won world junior titles. People in Egypt knew about pentathlon and knew my name," recalls Medany.

"They said, ‘OK, for sure she will get a medal. Aya Medany is our last hope.’ All the media was on my head, and in Egypt they were all talking about me. ‘If she wins, she’ll get this and this, she’ll be the first woman in Egypt to do that.’"

On the day, Medany could not live up to the hype.

"I don’t know what to say, except that there can’t be anything worse than Beijing," she says, with a dry laugh.

"The fencing and swimming was OK but the horses [which are assigned randomly to athletes] weren’t very good for the riding. Mine knocked too many fences down - he needed strong hands and I was 19 years old, I didn’t have strong hands. I finished eighth."

Did the media understand?

"No. The media… I’m sorry," she looks at our microphone and laughs, "the media really don’t know what the athletes feel. They don’t know my sport. They put everything on the riding being bad, and me needing an improvement in riding. It wasn’t really my fault."

Since Beijing, Medany’s quest to wear the clothing she wants during her events has helped to appease journalists at home. Medany is again a face of the Olympics in Egypt this year, but two new obstacles have emerged in the intervening years.

The first was the 2011 revolution in Egypt, embodied in vast rallies in the capital’s Tahrir Square. Medany watched on TV at home - “my family didn’t agree with letting me be there, and I live a 45-minute drive away” - knowing the upheaval had a direct impact on her Olympic hopes.

Modern pentathlon had been due to stage two major events in Egypt that year, including the 2011 World Championships. But demonstrations continued throughout the year, and the venues were duly switched.

Though she knows her fate pales in comparison to wider changes afoot, she lost valuable training time and a vital chance to compete on home soil. Moreover, a government in turmoil had little time to worry about modern pentathletes.

"The sport hasn’t got good funding and now we have a lot of problems, especially after the revolution," she says. "We can’t even talk, we don’t know what to do, although at least until now they have let us travel."

The second demon is injury.

"I have a lot of pain in the joints around my hip. I have a problem with the nerve and the muscles around it," she says. "The muscles are pushing the nerve hard, so I’m having physiotherapy to help me train normally and not feel the pain."

While Medany contemplates walking away from her sport after London 2012, if she cannot keep her injury at bay, she faces limping off the scene before August.

"I don’t want to say ‘if’ about the Olympics. We don’t like to say ‘if’. This is my situation now, and to solve this problem I have to work on it," she insists.

"There is no if, if, if. Hopefully in London it will be OK."

*additional pictures used by FY Africa Rocks from Aya Medany’s website.

(Source: BBC)

While surfing remains a popular water sports, many people don’t associate the African coastline with the sport. So, without further ado, allow us to introduce you to just a few super awesome places to ride waves along the African coastline!

5 GREAT SURFING SPOTS ON THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

Angola - Cabo Ledo

Type of Break: Point Break

According to those who regularly go there, winter is the best time to visit Cabo Ledo to surf. The surf originates from groundswells and the best swell angle comes from the southwest and provides a long ride. This particular spot, about 125km south of the country’s capital Luanda, is a favourite among those familiar with surfing in Angola.

Ghana - Busua Beach

Type of Break: Beach and Reef

The waves off of Busua Beach’s 2.5 miles of sandy beach along the Gold Coast have proven friendly for beginner surfers, with the bigger and more consistent waves coming in during the rainy season. Living or vacationing around the area is very light on the pocket, which is always a great plus. 

Type of Break: Beach Break

Morocco - Taghazout

Type of Break: Beach Break

Who can resist gaining some knowledge in one of the world’s oldest cities, while having access to a coastline with some of the best waves on the continent? This particular spot became very popular during the 60s, and has since become a staple for the surfer looking to explore the African shores.

Plus, one of the surf stores there is run by the country’s best surfer guy - Yassine Ramdani, who also happens to give lessons to the less experienced.

Mozambique - Ponta do Ouro 

Type of Break: Point Break

With its long waves, this spot on the South Eastern coast of Africa is perfect for intermediate surfers, often giving a good, solid long ride. Careful though, because the often 1km ride can become treacherous even for more adventurous cats! The country, having previously been a Portuguese colony, is full of the influences of its former coloniser - evident in the architecture, language and food. It’s easiest to access this part of Mozambique via the South African border nearest to Kosi Bay.

South Africa: Jeffrey’s Bay 

Type of Break: Point Break

Supertubes!!! This is South Africa’s premiere surf spot and one of the world’s most consistent tubes. Jeffrey’s Bay has some of the best waves for experienced surfers - don’t try it until you’ve earned your surfing stripes!

There are about 170 good places to surf on the African content. Since these are a few favourites, this list is far from complete. Submissions always welcome.

lostarkestra:

Fela Kuti

lostarkestra:

Fela Kuti

(via fyeahafricanmen)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.
Recipe
Ingredients
One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.
The Process
Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.
(Via Daily Monitor)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.
This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
  • Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
  • A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
  • Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
  • For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
  • Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.

The Process

  • Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
  • After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
  • You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.

(Via Daily Monitor)

(via africaisdonesuffering)

SA helped land Curiosity Mars rover
A South African team helped Nasa to land the Curiosity rover on Mars, the SA National Space Agency (Sansa) says.

The agency was proud to be part of Monday’s historic touch-down on the red planet, international business manager Tiaan Strydom said.
"This is one of the most important explorations of space by one of the most advanced space-faring nations in the world; and as Sansa we celebrate this event with the rest of humanity."
Curiosity was a US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) rover equipped to look for and analyse soil and rock samples for signs of alien life.
Due to its plutonium battery, Curiosity was able to work around the clock, as opposed to its solar-powered predecessors, like Spirit and Opportunity.
Managing director of Sansa space operations Raoul Hodges said the satellite tracking, telemetry (remote measurement and collection of data), and command team had demonstrated its expertise and proved it was capable of supporting most large-scale space missions.
Curiosity’s mission is expected to last at least one Martian year, which equates to 686 earth days. During this time, it would assess whether Mars had ever supported microbial life.

SA helped land Curiosity Mars rover

A South African team helped Nasa to land the Curiosity rover on Mars, the SA National Space Agency (Sansa) says.

The agency was proud to be part of Monday’s historic touch-down on the red planet, international business manager Tiaan Strydom said.

"This is one of the most important explorations of space by one of the most advanced space-faring nations in the world; and as Sansa we celebrate this event with the rest of humanity."

Curiosity was a US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) rover equipped to look for and analyse soil and rock samples for signs of alien life.

Due to its plutonium battery, Curiosity was able to work around the clock, as opposed to its solar-powered predecessors, like Spirit and Opportunity.

Managing director of Sansa space operations Raoul Hodges said the satellite tracking, telemetry (remote measurement and collection of data), and command team had demonstrated its expertise and proved it was capable of supporting most large-scale space missions.

Curiosity’s mission is expected to last at least one Martian year, which equates to 686 earth days. During this time, it would assess whether Mars had ever supported microbial life.

I wanted to write an answer on the article but it was too long :p

So I think Peternell deserves to go to London since he’s the best (in the ranking) 
What the Chief says is stupid about a real countrymen
They should know that if you want to compete against the best riders in the world, you have to come to Europe (I live in Belgium, and we are let’s say the Mecca of showjumping, especially Brussels) Horses can’t stand such long trips up and down from SA to EU, they can but not 4 to 5 times a year.
I ride dressage and when I check the list of Interntional competitions, I never see one in SA nor for dressage nor showjumping nor eventing.

So yeah … :) 

**FYAfrica Rocks Note: This is a submission in response to an earlier question on whether the South African eventing rider Peternell should compete in the Olympics representing South Africa. Read the post here

africaisdonesuffering:

Flash Mob in the streets of Bujumbura, Burundi.

submitted by: ohmydou

Olympic flag bearers
Doreen Lawrence, mother of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in a racially motivated attack in South East London. She has since fought for justice for victims of racially motivated violence.
Muhammad Ali, champion boxer, human and civil rights activist.
Sally Becker, British volunteer and goodwill ambassador.
Shami Chakrabart, Academic, Director of Liberty, a council promoting civil liberties and Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University.
Haille Gebreselassie, Ethiopian long distance athlete, record breaker and goodwill ambassador.
Ban Ki-moon, current Secretary General of the United Nations. 
Marina Silver, Brazilian environmentalist and politician, who has openly said she aims to be "the first African-Brazilian woman of poor origin" to become president of Brazil.

Olympic flag bearers

Doreen Lawrence, mother of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in a racially motivated attack in South East London. She has since fought for justice for victims of racially motivated violence.

Muhammad Ali, champion boxer, human and civil rights activist.

Sally Becker, British volunteer and goodwill ambassador.

Shami Chakrabart, Academic, Director of Liberty, a council promoting civil liberties and Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University.

Haille Gebreselassie, Ethiopian long distance athlete, record breaker and goodwill ambassador.

Ban Ki-moon, current Secretary General of the United Nations. 

Marina Silver, Brazilian environmentalist and politician, who has openly said she aims to be "the first African-Brazilian woman of poor origin" to become president of Brazil.

A Cameroonian athlete proudly flying flags during the Olympic Athlete Parade.

A Cameroonian athlete proudly flying flags during the Olympic Athlete Parade.

366flags:

LIBERIAThe Republic of Liberia is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Sierra Leone on the west, Guinea on the north and Côte d’Ivoire on the east. It covers an area of 111,369 km2 and is home to about 3.7 million people. English is the official language, while over 30 indigenous languages are spoken within the country.
Along with Ethiopia, Liberia is one of two modern countries in Sub-Saharan Africa without roots in the European colonization of Africa. Beginning in 1820, the region was colonized by free blacks from the United States; most of them had been formerly enslaved. With the help of the American Colonization Society, a private organization that believed ex-slaves would have greater freedom and equality in Africa, these immigrants from the U.S. established a new country. African captives freed from slave ships were also sent there instead of being repatriated to their countries of origin. In 1847, these colonists founded the Republic of Liberia, establishing a government modeled on that of the United States and naming the capital city Monrovia after James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States and a prominent supporter of the colonization. The colonists, known as Americo-Liberians, led the political and economic sectors of the country.
A military coup overthrew the Americo-Liberian leadership in 1980, marking the beginning of political and economic instability and two successive civil wars that left approximately 250,000 people dead and devastated the country’s economy. A 2003 peace deal led to democratic elections in 2005. [Source: Wikipedia]
Further Information:
Country Info
Flag Info

366flags:

LIBERIA
The Republic of Liberia is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Sierra Leone on the west, Guinea on the north and Côte d’Ivoire on the east. It covers an area of 111,369 km2 and is home to about 3.7 million people. English is the official language, while over 30 indigenous languages are spoken within the country.

Along with Ethiopia, Liberia is one of two modern countries in Sub-Saharan Africa without roots in the European colonization of Africa. Beginning in 1820, the region was colonized by free blacks from the United States; most of them had been formerly enslaved. With the help of the American Colonization Society, a private organization that believed ex-slaves would have greater freedom and equality in Africa, these immigrants from the U.S. established a new country. African captives freed from slave ships were also sent there instead of being repatriated to their countries of origin. In 1847, these colonists founded the Republic of Liberia, establishing a government modeled on that of the United States and naming the capital city Monrovia after James Monroe, the fifth president of the United States and a prominent supporter of the colonization. The colonists, known as Americo-Liberians, led the political and economic sectors of the country.

A military coup overthrew the Americo-Liberian leadership in 1980, marking the beginning of political and economic instability and two successive civil wars that left approximately 250,000 people dead and devastated the country’s economy. A 2003 peace deal led to democratic elections in 2005. [Source: Wikipedia]

Further Information:

Wajdi Bouallègue was born 9 February 1982 in Tunis, Tunisia. His father Mohamed Habib Bouallègue is his coach, as well as a former gymnastics champion. He’s won 21 gold medals in Africa, a record unmatched by any gymnast on the African continent. He is the only gymnast that will be representing Tunisia at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London.

Aya Medany is surprisingly young to be preparing for her third Olympic Games - and considering retirement.

Medany, not yet 24, is a modern pentathlete who made her debut for Egypt at the Athens Olympics in 2004, aged just 15.

Her sport demands that she fence, swim, ride horses, run and shoot. Her beliefs demand that she do it wearing specific clothing.

Medany, the only elite pentathlete to compete wearing a hijab, now thinks she may have to quit because of the conflict between her religion and her sport.

"I might have to choose after London 2012. I might have to leave," she tells BBC Sport after this year’s World Championships in Rome, where she finished 12th.

The problem is not the hijab, even though Medany says it puts her at a disadvantage when running.

Swimming is the issue - Medany wants to swim in an outfit which fully covers her body in order to conform with her interpretation of her Muslim faith, which emphasises modesty in dress.

However, the UIPM - modern pentathlon’s world governing body - will not let that happen.

Pentathlon takes its cue from Fina, the organisation which runs world swimming. Fina’s rules, amended in 2009 after outcry over ‘super-fast’ full-body swimsuits, state that swimwear for female competitors “shall not cover the neck, extend past the shoulder, nor extend below the knee”. Hence, Medany has to obey those rules.

That puts her in an awkward position regarding the media back home in Egypt and her public portrayal. But the UIPM told BBC Sport it cannot make exceptions for one athlete, even a woman it acknowledges has single-handedly established pentathlon on the African continent.

Medany’s is a complex case. She only took up wearing a hijab following the 2008 Beijing Games, and her relationship with reporters in her home country has been uneasy.

Egypt is a country of few genuine Olympic contenders, but Medany went to Beijing with a real chance of a medal. Come the women’s pentathlon, on the last day of the Games, Egypt had just one other medal: a bronze won by Hesham Mesbah in men’s judo.

"By the time of Beijing, I had won world junior titles. People in Egypt knew about pentathlon and knew my name," recalls Medany.

"They said, ‘OK, for sure she will get a medal. Aya Medany is our last hope.’ All the media was on my head, and in Egypt they were all talking about me. ‘If she wins, she’ll get this and this, she’ll be the first woman in Egypt to do that.’"

On the day, Medany could not live up to the hype.

"I don’t know what to say, except that there can’t be anything worse than Beijing," she says, with a dry laugh.

"The fencing and swimming was OK but the horses [which are assigned randomly to athletes] weren’t very good for the riding. Mine knocked too many fences down - he needed strong hands and I was 19 years old, I didn’t have strong hands. I finished eighth."

Did the media understand?

"No. The media… I’m sorry," she looks at our microphone and laughs, "the media really don’t know what the athletes feel. They don’t know my sport. They put everything on the riding being bad, and me needing an improvement in riding. It wasn’t really my fault."

Since Beijing, Medany’s quest to wear the clothing she wants during her events has helped to appease journalists at home. Medany is again a face of the Olympics in Egypt this year, but two new obstacles have emerged in the intervening years.

The first was the 2011 revolution in Egypt, embodied in vast rallies in the capital’s Tahrir Square. Medany watched on TV at home - “my family didn’t agree with letting me be there, and I live a 45-minute drive away” - knowing the upheaval had a direct impact on her Olympic hopes.

Modern pentathlon had been due to stage two major events in Egypt that year, including the 2011 World Championships. But demonstrations continued throughout the year, and the venues were duly switched.

Though she knows her fate pales in comparison to wider changes afoot, she lost valuable training time and a vital chance to compete on home soil. Moreover, a government in turmoil had little time to worry about modern pentathletes.

"The sport hasn’t got good funding and now we have a lot of problems, especially after the revolution," she says. "We can’t even talk, we don’t know what to do, although at least until now they have let us travel."

The second demon is injury.

"I have a lot of pain in the joints around my hip. I have a problem with the nerve and the muscles around it," she says. "The muscles are pushing the nerve hard, so I’m having physiotherapy to help me train normally and not feel the pain."

While Medany contemplates walking away from her sport after London 2012, if she cannot keep her injury at bay, she faces limping off the scene before August.

"I don’t want to say ‘if’ about the Olympics. We don’t like to say ‘if’. This is my situation now, and to solve this problem I have to work on it," she insists.

"There is no if, if, if. Hopefully in London it will be OK."

*additional pictures used by FY Africa Rocks from Aya Medany’s website.

(Source: BBC)

While surfing remains a popular water sports, many people don’t associate the African coastline with the sport. So, without further ado, allow us to introduce you to just a few super awesome places to ride waves along the African coastline!

5 GREAT SURFING SPOTS ON THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

Angola - Cabo Ledo

Type of Break: Point Break

According to those who regularly go there, winter is the best time to visit Cabo Ledo to surf. The surf originates from groundswells and the best swell angle comes from the southwest and provides a long ride. This particular spot, about 125km south of the country’s capital Luanda, is a favourite among those familiar with surfing in Angola.

Ghana - Busua Beach

Type of Break: Beach and Reef

The waves off of Busua Beach’s 2.5 miles of sandy beach along the Gold Coast have proven friendly for beginner surfers, with the bigger and more consistent waves coming in during the rainy season. Living or vacationing around the area is very light on the pocket, which is always a great plus. 

Type of Break: Beach Break

Morocco - Taghazout

Type of Break: Beach Break

Who can resist gaining some knowledge in one of the world’s oldest cities, while having access to a coastline with some of the best waves on the continent? This particular spot became very popular during the 60s, and has since become a staple for the surfer looking to explore the African shores.

Plus, one of the surf stores there is run by the country’s best surfer guy - Yassine Ramdani, who also happens to give lessons to the less experienced.

Mozambique - Ponta do Ouro 

Type of Break: Point Break

With its long waves, this spot on the South Eastern coast of Africa is perfect for intermediate surfers, often giving a good, solid long ride. Careful though, because the often 1km ride can become treacherous even for more adventurous cats! The country, having previously been a Portuguese colony, is full of the influences of its former coloniser - evident in the architecture, language and food. It’s easiest to access this part of Mozambique via the South African border nearest to Kosi Bay.

South Africa: Jeffrey’s Bay 

Type of Break: Point Break

Supertubes!!! This is South Africa’s premiere surf spot and one of the world’s most consistent tubes. Jeffrey’s Bay has some of the best waves for experienced surfers - don’t try it until you’ve earned your surfing stripes!

There are about 170 good places to surf on the African content. Since these are a few favourites, this list is far from complete. Submissions always welcome.

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