/page/2
typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.
Recipe
Ingredients
One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.
The Process
Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.
(Via Daily Monitor)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.
This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
  • Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
  • A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
  • Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
  • For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
  • Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.

The Process

  • Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
  • After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
  • You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.

(Via Daily Monitor)

(via africaisdonesuffering)

everything-ghana:

What does it mean when africans say “you go kill me shy” ???

Do AFRICANS say that? CHECK YOURSELF.

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

barf. 

LOL Africa black. What in the world is Africa black? People are so funny. 

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

barf. 

LOL Africa black. What in the world is Africa black? People are so funny. 

searchingforknowledge:

aphoticoccurrences:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

carosene:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

This article has some quality points—I’m glad that people are talking about people talking about whether Caster sabotaged her race. 

I agree with the writer—Caster didn’t seem like she’d ran the race of her life, but based on the things she said afterwards—not just about not being on fire, but also she said that her coach would be mad at her—it didn’t seem like this was a strategy. I think it was psychological.

However, I disagree wholeheartedly on the idea that Caster needs to come out with the exact state of her genitals and hormone levels. No matter what the results are, people are not going to stop talking. If she’s even a little bit intersex, which she probably is, people are going to say that she has an advantage. And hasn’t her privacy been invaded enough? 

The writer’s dilemma—tell us about your genitals or go home for your own sake—is a false one. Let’s all agree, the muttering is stupid, but you don’t tell an Olympic champion to stop competing because a few people suspect she threw her race.

Caster, you’re amazing, keep up the good work, and I’ll see you in Rio de Janeiro 2016.

I think Caster will always have someone saying something about her. At such a young age, when she should have been celebrating an amazing achievement in her career, she was humiliated and made to feel like there is something wrong with her womanhood - that probably changed a lot of things for her. It’s traumatic and it shouldn’t happen to anyone. The amount of coverage that has been dedicated to this woman’s genitalia and hormones or lack thereof is still insane and always takes away from her immense talent. She shouldn’t have to publicise anything - the “scientists” have deemed her “woman enough” - whatever that is - to compete against other women, so she shouldn’t have to open herself up to even more public abuse and humiliation - no human being deserves that. I know her country is behind her, and I think fellow women should be too, as should her fellow competitors. 

i saw the race and thought the same thing. she was cruising for 90% of the race in dead last, and 5 seconds til the finish line she amped it up and passed damn near all the chicks? i think it definitely was psychological and i really hate that she had to go through all she went through. her heart may not be in it anymore after how she’s been treated. 

Yo. FUCK the writer for demanding that Caster be telling all  of us all bout her bodily makeup. THE PROBLEM ISN’T CASTER. ITS US. IT. IS. US. IT IS US, STUFFED WITH WHITE EUROPEAN IDEAS OF WHAT MAKES WOMEN WOMEN WHICH IS BE AS MUCH LIKE THIN WHITE WOMEN AS YOU CAN THATS THE PROBLEM. WE NEED TO FIX OURSELVES, AND LEAVE THIS WOMAN TO LIVE HER LIFE.

Bolded. And then the media that perpetuates those standards and is even malicious enough to continue feeding those conversations.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

carosene:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

This article has some quality points—I’m glad that people are talking about people talking about whether Caster sabotaged her race. 

I agree with the writer—Caster didn’t seem like she’d ran the race of her life, but based on the things she said afterwards—not just about not being on fire, but also she said that her coach would be mad at her—it didn’t seem like this was a strategy. I think it was psychological.

However, I disagree wholeheartedly on the idea that Caster needs to come out with the exact state of her genitals and hormone levels. No matter what the results are, people are not going to stop talking. If she’s even a little bit intersex, which she probably is, people are going to say that she has an advantage. And hasn’t her privacy been invaded enough? 

The writer’s dilemma—tell us about your genitals or go home for your own sake—is a false one. Let’s all agree, the muttering is stupid, but you don’t tell an Olympic champion to stop competing because a few people suspect she threw her race.

Caster, you’re amazing, keep up the good work, and I’ll see you in Rio de Janeiro 2016.

I think Caster will always have someone saying something about her. At such a young age, when she should have been celebrating an amazing achievement in her career, she was humiliated and made to feel like there is something wrong with her womanhood - that probably changed a lot of things for her. It’s traumatic and it shouldn’t happen to anyone. The amount of coverage that has been dedicated to this woman’s genitalia and hormones or lack thereof is still insane and always takes away from her immense talent. She shouldn’t have to publicise anything - the “scientists” have deemed her “woman enough” - whatever that is - to compete against other women, so she shouldn’t have to open herself up to even more public abuse and humiliation - no human being deserves that. I know her country is behind her, and I think fellow women should be too, as should her fellow competitors. 

(via camoccino)

typicalugandan:

Stephen Kiprotich wins gold in the men’s Olympic marathon. Uganda’s first medal at the london olympic games this year; Uganda’s first Olympic medal since 1996, Uganda’s only gold since the Great John Akii Bua!!!
Stephen Kiprotich took gold and his first major title in a time of 2 hours 8 minutes 1 second.

typicalugandan:

Stephen Kiprotich wins gold in the men’s Olympic marathon. Uganda’s first medal at the london olympic games this year; Uganda’s first Olympic medal since 1996, Uganda’s only gold since the Great John Akii Bua!!!

Stephen Kiprotich took gold and his first major title in a time of 2 hours 8 minutes 1 second.

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

Chappal Waddi is a mountain in Nigeria and, at 2,419 meters, is the country’s highest point. It is located in Taraba State, near the border with Cameroon, in the Gashaka Forest Reserve.

Chappal Waddi is a mountain in Nigeria and, at 2,419 meters, is the country’s highest point. It is located in Taraba State, near the border with Cameroon, in the Gashaka Forest Reserve.

jimchuchu:

Yay!!!

atane:

Just a Band is a Kenyan group that describes themselves as Africa’s Super-Nerdy Electronic Music/Art collective.

These are some pics I took from their show last weekend.

(via africaisdonesuffering)

Now I see that some of you fear to go forward to fight for our king. If it [was] in the brave days of Osei Tutu, Okomfo Anokye, and Opoku Ware, chiefs would not sit down to see their king to be taken away without firing a shot. No European could have dared speak to chiefs of Asante in the way the governor spoke to you this morning. Is it true that the bravery of Asante is no more? I cannot believe it. It cannot be! I must say this: if you, the men of Asante, will not go forward, then we will. We, the women, will. I shall call upon my fellow women. We will fight! We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields.
– Yaa Asantewaa (via collective-history)

(via ghanailoveyou)

TENA NA TENA, TENA NA TENA!

ghanailoveyou:

Blitz The Ambassador’s Band (by atane1980)

ghanailoveyou:

Blitz The Ambassador’s Band (by atane1980)

(via everything-ghana)

Trucks line up along the N3 on-ramp in Harrismith, South Africa, after snow in the Free State town forced officials to close the major route between Villiers and Van Reenen’s Pass.

Trucks line up along the N3 on-ramp in Harrismith, South Africa, after snow in the Free State town forced officials to close the major route between Villiers and Van Reenen’s Pass.

lostarkestra:

Fela Kuti

lostarkestra:

Fela Kuti

(via fyeahafricanmen)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.
Recipe
Ingredients
One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.
The Process
Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.
(Via Daily Monitor)

typicalugandan:

Empengyere; For many generations, people in Kigezi region, mainly the Bakiga, have enjoyed this delicacy.
This corn-based (maize) meal is normally mixed with beans and at times some greens to make a treat enjoyed by many who taste it.

Recipe

Ingredients

  • One needs four basic ingredients to cook the meal; water, maize corn, beans and rock salt. However in the modern way of cooking, several other ingredients like green peppers, small egg plants or even greens can be added to make the meal more tasty and interesting.
  • Well sorted and cleaned corn and beans
  • A sizeable pan as the cooked maize will expand to the top of the pan.
  • Water and enough fuel is also needed for a long wait.
  • For two kilogrammes of maize, you need at least five litres of water a sizeable pan that can accommodate such an amount of water.
  • Cooking is just a matter of boiling corn with water; the process would take up to five hours before it is completely ready for eating. One must ensure that the fire boiling the maize is steady at all times.

The Process

  • Put water in the pan and add corn, put on fire and start boiling.
  • After one hour of boiling, add rock salt to increase the temperature of the boiling water and quicken the process. Boil for another hour and add beans to the corn. Leave to boil for another hour and then add more rock salt to the mixture.
  • You would have to add water more than three times because of the expanding maize and beans. 40 minutes after adding the rock salt one can then put other ingredients of choice in the mixture. You can add vegetables like bean leaves or black night shade to give it a taste. However, it’s always better to leave it to boil without additives to ensure an original taste.

(Via Daily Monitor)

(via africaisdonesuffering)

everything-ghana:

What does it mean when africans say “you go kill me shy” ???

Do AFRICANS say that? CHECK YOURSELF.

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

barf. 

LOL Africa black. What in the world is Africa black? People are so funny. 

oppressedbrowngirlsdoingthings:

barf. 

LOL Africa black. What in the world is Africa black? People are so funny. 

searchingforknowledge:

aphoticoccurrences:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

carosene:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

This article has some quality points—I’m glad that people are talking about people talking about whether Caster sabotaged her race. 

I agree with the writer—Caster didn’t seem like she’d ran the race of her life, but based on the things she said afterwards—not just about not being on fire, but also she said that her coach would be mad at her—it didn’t seem like this was a strategy. I think it was psychological.

However, I disagree wholeheartedly on the idea that Caster needs to come out with the exact state of her genitals and hormone levels. No matter what the results are, people are not going to stop talking. If she’s even a little bit intersex, which she probably is, people are going to say that she has an advantage. And hasn’t her privacy been invaded enough? 

The writer’s dilemma—tell us about your genitals or go home for your own sake—is a false one. Let’s all agree, the muttering is stupid, but you don’t tell an Olympic champion to stop competing because a few people suspect she threw her race.

Caster, you’re amazing, keep up the good work, and I’ll see you in Rio de Janeiro 2016.

I think Caster will always have someone saying something about her. At such a young age, when she should have been celebrating an amazing achievement in her career, she was humiliated and made to feel like there is something wrong with her womanhood - that probably changed a lot of things for her. It’s traumatic and it shouldn’t happen to anyone. The amount of coverage that has been dedicated to this woman’s genitalia and hormones or lack thereof is still insane and always takes away from her immense talent. She shouldn’t have to publicise anything - the “scientists” have deemed her “woman enough” - whatever that is - to compete against other women, so she shouldn’t have to open herself up to even more public abuse and humiliation - no human being deserves that. I know her country is behind her, and I think fellow women should be too, as should her fellow competitors. 

i saw the race and thought the same thing. she was cruising for 90% of the race in dead last, and 5 seconds til the finish line she amped it up and passed damn near all the chicks? i think it definitely was psychological and i really hate that she had to go through all she went through. her heart may not be in it anymore after how she’s been treated. 

Yo. FUCK the writer for demanding that Caster be telling all  of us all bout her bodily makeup. THE PROBLEM ISN’T CASTER. ITS US. IT. IS. US. IT IS US, STUFFED WITH WHITE EUROPEAN IDEAS OF WHAT MAKES WOMEN WOMEN WHICH IS BE AS MUCH LIKE THIN WHITE WOMEN AS YOU CAN THATS THE PROBLEM. WE NEED TO FIX OURSELVES, AND LEAVE THIS WOMAN TO LIVE HER LIFE.

Bolded. And then the media that perpetuates those standards and is even malicious enough to continue feeding those conversations.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

carosene:

fuckyeahafricarocks:

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

This article has some quality points—I’m glad that people are talking about people talking about whether Caster sabotaged her race. 

I agree with the writer—Caster didn’t seem like she’d ran the race of her life, but based on the things she said afterwards—not just about not being on fire, but also she said that her coach would be mad at her—it didn’t seem like this was a strategy. I think it was psychological.

However, I disagree wholeheartedly on the idea that Caster needs to come out with the exact state of her genitals and hormone levels. No matter what the results are, people are not going to stop talking. If she’s even a little bit intersex, which she probably is, people are going to say that she has an advantage. And hasn’t her privacy been invaded enough? 

The writer’s dilemma—tell us about your genitals or go home for your own sake—is a false one. Let’s all agree, the muttering is stupid, but you don’t tell an Olympic champion to stop competing because a few people suspect she threw her race.

Caster, you’re amazing, keep up the good work, and I’ll see you in Rio de Janeiro 2016.

I think Caster will always have someone saying something about her. At such a young age, when she should have been celebrating an amazing achievement in her career, she was humiliated and made to feel like there is something wrong with her womanhood - that probably changed a lot of things for her. It’s traumatic and it shouldn’t happen to anyone. The amount of coverage that has been dedicated to this woman’s genitalia and hormones or lack thereof is still insane and always takes away from her immense talent. She shouldn’t have to publicise anything - the “scientists” have deemed her “woman enough” - whatever that is - to compete against other women, so she shouldn’t have to open herself up to even more public abuse and humiliation - no human being deserves that. I know her country is behind her, and I think fellow women should be too, as should her fellow competitors. 

(via camoccino)

typicalugandan:

Stephen Kiprotich wins gold in the men’s Olympic marathon. Uganda’s first medal at the london olympic games this year; Uganda’s first Olympic medal since 1996, Uganda’s only gold since the Great John Akii Bua!!!
Stephen Kiprotich took gold and his first major title in a time of 2 hours 8 minutes 1 second.

typicalugandan:

Stephen Kiprotich wins gold in the men’s Olympic marathon. Uganda’s first medal at the london olympic games this year; Uganda’s first Olympic medal since 1996, Uganda’s only gold since the Great John Akii Bua!!!

Stephen Kiprotich took gold and his first major title in a time of 2 hours 8 minutes 1 second.

Did Caster Semenya Lose the Women’s 800 Meters on Purpose?

Russia’s Mariya Savinova, the reigning women’s world champion in the 800 meters, won the Olympic gold medal on Saturday night. Even so, the Russian got second billing behind the second-place finisher, South Africa’s Caster Semenya. In 2009, Semenya won the world title in the 800 as an 18-year-old. Her reward was being kept out of competition for 11 months while her sport’s governing body investigated her gender. Back on the track, and racing against women, Semenya spent most of tonight’s race at the back of the pack, making her move only in the final 200 meters. It was enough to get her on the podium, but not to win Olympic gold.

After the race, track and field aficionados questioned her tactics. The BBC’s David Ornstein said it appeared that Semenya “had more left in the tank.” His story quoted BBC commentator Kelly Holmes, who won this event in the 2004 Olympics, suggesting that Semenya hadn’t made her best effort: “She looked very strong, she didn’t look like she went up a gear, she wasn’t grimacing at all. I don’t know if her head was in it, when she crossed the line she didn’t look affected.” Meanwhile, Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden tweeted that Semenya “seemed oddly disengaged most of race and not tired at end.”

In her post-race interview, Semenya said, “The body was not really on fire today.” But the spring in her step at the end of the race—Layden said she “seemed aerobically relaxed two steps past finish line”—led others to speculate that she had pulled a badminton moveand tanked the race. Why would someone intentionally perform below their standard in the biggest race in four years? One South African track and field observer suggested that it might be “scandal avoidance”—her 2009 triumph brought such unpleasant consequences that she’d just as soon avoid further scrutiny, and an Olympic silver medal brings considerably less attention than the gold.

This response was predictable. In fact, Sports Illustrated’s David Epstein called it in a piece published days before the final: “If Semenya wins the gold, she is likely to be accused of having an unfair advantage. If she runs poorly, she is likely to be accused of sandbagging the race so as not to be accused of having an unfair advantage.”

Epstein summarized the response that followed her high-profile breakthrough in 2009, a year in which she improved her personal best in the 800 meters by more than eight seconds. “The combination of her stunning drop in time, her deep voice, and her armor-like torso elicited venom from some of her competitors,” he wrote. It also led the International Association of Athletics Federations to investigate Semenya’s gender makeup.

Neither the IAAF nor Semenya’s camp have revealed the results of the tests. That doesn’t mean that press outlets haven’t speculated on them—an “allegedly” here or a “reportedly” there often precedes the conjecture. Here SI’s Epstein’s version: “the results … reportedly showed that while Semenya has external female genitalia, she has internal testes, no womb or ovaries and elevated levels of testosterone. This means that she has what doctors call a disorder of sexual development, and has some traits that are typically associated with women and others that are typically associated with men.”

Semenya’s decision not to discuss her hormones and ovaries with strangers likely means that her athletic performance will always be questioned. Is she tanking? Is she being slowed down by hormone treatments? Is she tactically inept? Was her body just insufficiently fiery? I suspect that even if she started every press conference by reciting her estrogen level that day, she’d still be suspect. Described—admiringly—by the New Yorker’s Ariel Levy as “breathtakingly butch,” Semenya is unapologetically strong and muscular—she’s often photographed flexing her biceps, and she made a similar gesture on the medal podium Saturday evening. (A non-standard gender presentation means nothing, of course. I’m called “sir” at least twice a week. That doesn’t mean I can run fast.)

At the end of a long blog post at the Science of Sport blog, Ross Tucker encouraged Semenya to open up about the IAAF’s findings: “If Semenya is to win people over, as she should … then the secrecy must be lifted.” I agree.

Semenya has never run faster than she did the day she won the world title in 2009. If she is sabotaging her races to minimize scrutiny, the tactic is obviously failing—she has already received much more attention than anyone else in the Olympic final. But I suspect that her issues are psychological. Three years ago, the IAAF humiliated her publicly and subjected her to all manner of intrusive physical tests. Track and field’s powers that be eventually cleared her to race, but the whispering will continue until she releases the results. If she doesn’t want to reveal her medical history to millions of nosey strangers, it might be best for her to stay out of the spotlight altogether. That would be a tragedy, but at least it would end all the muttering.

Chappal Waddi is a mountain in Nigeria and, at 2,419 meters, is the country’s highest point. It is located in Taraba State, near the border with Cameroon, in the Gashaka Forest Reserve.

Chappal Waddi is a mountain in Nigeria and, at 2,419 meters, is the country’s highest point. It is located in Taraba State, near the border with Cameroon, in the Gashaka Forest Reserve.

jimchuchu:

Yay!!!

atane:

Just a Band is a Kenyan group that describes themselves as Africa’s Super-Nerdy Electronic Music/Art collective.

These are some pics I took from their show last weekend.

(via africaisdonesuffering)

Now I see that some of you fear to go forward to fight for our king. If it [was] in the brave days of Osei Tutu, Okomfo Anokye, and Opoku Ware, chiefs would not sit down to see their king to be taken away without firing a shot. No European could have dared speak to chiefs of Asante in the way the governor spoke to you this morning. Is it true that the bravery of Asante is no more? I cannot believe it. It cannot be! I must say this: if you, the men of Asante, will not go forward, then we will. We, the women, will. I shall call upon my fellow women. We will fight! We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields.
– Yaa Asantewaa (via collective-history)

(via ghanailoveyou)

TENA NA TENA, TENA NA TENA!

ghanailoveyou:

Blitz The Ambassador’s Band (by atane1980)

ghanailoveyou:

Blitz The Ambassador’s Band (by atane1980)

(via everything-ghana)

Trucks line up along the N3 on-ramp in Harrismith, South Africa, after snow in the Free State town forced officials to close the major route between Villiers and Van Reenen’s Pass.

Trucks line up along the N3 on-ramp in Harrismith, South Africa, after snow in the Free State town forced officials to close the major route between Villiers and Van Reenen’s Pass.

"Now I see that some of you fear to go forward to fight for our king. If it [was] in the brave days of Osei Tutu, Okomfo Anokye, and Opoku Ware, chiefs would not sit down to see their king to be taken away without firing a shot. No European could have dared speak to chiefs of Asante in the way the governor spoke to you this morning. Is it true that the bravery of Asante is no more? I cannot believe it. It cannot be! I must say this: if you, the men of Asante, will not go forward, then we will. We, the women, will. I shall call upon my fellow women. We will fight! We will fight till the last of us falls in the battlefields."
are the people in charge still debating whether or not global warming actually exists?!

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